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Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Division of Intramural Research

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Postdoctoral Openings

The following laboratories are currently recruiting postdoctoral fellows:

Angiogenesis Research in the Zebrafish

Dr. Brant Weinstein

Entry ID: PD-3803

A postdoctoral position is available at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, to study developmental angiogenesis in the zebrafish. The laboratory uses molecular, cellular, genetic, and transgenic approaches to study the specification, patterning, and differentiation of the developing vascular system. Some of our current areas of research interest include: understanding how blood vessels are specified and differentiate as arteries or veins; understanding how vessels assemble into reproducibly patterned networks, and what cues guide this patterning; studying how endothelial cells undergo morphogenesis into tubular vessels in vivo using high-resolution multiphoton imaging and experimental manipulation; and isolating novel vascular-specific mutants and studying the molecular basis for their defects.

The scientific environment, resources, and stipend support are superb. See http://uvo.nichd.nih.gov/ for additional information.

Interested applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years' postdoctoral experience. To apply, click on t he button below, or send a curriculum vitae, bibliography, cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to flyingfish2@nih.gov, or via post to:

Brant M. Weinstein
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
NICHD, NIH
Building 6B, Room 309
6 Center Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892


Cellular Biology

Dr. Joan Marini

Entry ID: PD-4622

Expertise in technique of cell biology, including skill in microscopy, strongly preferred. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience. The position is available immediately. Candidates should send a copy of their curriculum vitae, bibliography, and contact details including phone number and e-mail address for at least 2 references to: Joan C. Marini, M.D., Ph.D., Chief, BEMB, NICHD, NIH, by e-mail to oidoc@helix.nih.gov.

The Bone and Extracellular Matrix Branch of NICHD conducts translational research on genetic disorders of bone. Our interest is in understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which defects in components of matrix cause bone disease, and then in applying this information for the care of our pediatric patients. We are seeking to fill a postdoctoral position involving the cell biology of osteoblasts from a murine model for osteogenesis imperfecta, and from OI patients. The project involves investigation of developmental abnormalities of OI osteoblasts and their cross-talk with osteoclasts, cell-matrix interactions, mutant collagen trafficking, chaperone interactions, and secretion.


Gene Therapy for Neurogenetic Disorders

Dr. Stephen Kaler

A postdoctoral position is available July, 2012 in the Molecular Medicine Program, NICHD, NIH. We employ gene transfer strategies in animal models of copper transport and lysosomal storage diseases. Future goals include first-in-human gene therapy trials for lethal monogenic neurometabolic disorders.

Experience in gene therapy for animal models of human disease, and molecular and/or cell biology is essential. Candidates should have a M.D. or Ph.D. degree and less than five years postdoctoral lab experience.

Recent work includes:
1. Donsante A, Yi L, Zerfas PM, Brinster LR, Sullivan P, Goldstein DS, Prohaska J, Centeno J, Rushing E, Kaler SG. ATP7A gene addition to the choroid plexus results in long-term rescue of the lethal copper transport defect in a Menkes disease mouse model. Molecular Therapy advance online publication, August 30, 2011; doi:10.1038/mt.2011.143
2. Kaler SG. ATP7A-related copper transport diseases - emerging concepts and future trends. Nature Reviews Neurology 2011; 7:15-29
3. Kennerson ML, Nicholson GA, Kaler SG et al. Missense mutations in the copper transporter gene ATP7A cause X-linked distal hereditary motor neuropathy. Am J Hum Genet 2010; 86:343-352.
4. Kaler SG, Tang JR, Donsante A, Kaneski C: Translational read-through of a nonsense mutation in ATP7A. Ann Neurol 2009; 65:108-113
5. Kaler SG, Holmes CS, Goldstein DS, Tang JR, Godwin SC, Donsante A, Liew CJ, Sato S, Patronas N. Neonatal diagnosis and treatment of Menkes disease. N Engl J Med 2008; 358:605-614.

Additional information about our research group is available at: http://2010annualreport.nichd.nih.gov/uhcm.html or http://mmp.nichd.nih.gov/index.html

Potential applicants should email a note of interest and curriculum vitae to:

Stephen G. Kaler, M.D.
Molecular Medicine Program
NICHD, National Institutes of Health
10 Center Drive, Room 10N313, MSC 1853
Bethesda, MD 20892-1853
Email: kalers@mail.nih.gov


Global Regulation of Gene Expression at the Level of Transcription Specificity by ppGpp

Dr. Mike Cashel

Entry ID: PD-4944

Exponential cell growth in nutritionally limited environments occurs at less than optimal rates because of a very large number of metabolic adjustments. In this state, the new incremental rate of increase for each cellular component diminishes to the trickle of nutrients available. It has become evident that the coordination required to achieve this outcome is an interesting puzzle in cell biology and genetic expression. Our laboratory is interested in the fundamental problem of how cells are able to sense chemically different growth limitations and respond to each by coordinating global gene expression in order to either optimize, or adapt to a new state of growth. We study bacteria (E. coli) with a small, tractable genome that grows quickly and adapts readily. A major player in this sort of regulation is a guanine ribonucleotide analog, ppGpp, whose accumulation becomes a shared common signal of limitations for sources of energy, amino acids, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus or iron (See: Potrykus et al. Environ. Microbiol. 13: 563-575, 2011). We wish to understand the intricacies of how limitation for each nutrient leads to ppGpp accumulation, which in turn, signals of nutrient stress. The next part of this cascade is to learn how the ppGpp signal leads to global changes of transcriptional selectivity of a large portion (about 1/3rd) of the genome. This can occur by a direct interaction of ppGpp with RNA polymerase as well as by indirect effects to integrate the expression of genes that also globally govern RNA polymerase specificity (alternative sigma factors) or their function (See: Potrykus & Cashel, Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 62:35-51, 2008; Traxler et al., Mol. Microbiol. 79:830-845, 2011).

Adjustments to environmental changes common for bacteria can simultaneously inhibit or induce different genes. This has important practical consequences. For example, ppGpp is required in many bacterial pathogens for the development of virulence, production of toxins, formation of biofilms, generation of pheromones, and the expression of most virulence genes in pathogenicity islands (See Dalebroux et al, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 74:171-99, 2010. Virulence gene promoter sequences are very different from host gene promoters that are ppGpp regulated so it is expected that mechanisms of regulation may emerge from these studies that may provide new rationales for antibiotics and mechanisms of pathogenesis.

A successful postdoctoral candidate interested in pursuing research in this area should have an understanding of bacterial molecular genetics and physiology as well as a working expertise in pure system transcription and/or ppGpp regulation.

To apply, visit the NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education to view the current NIH Postdoctoral openings.


Hormone Receptors and Gonadal Cell Regulation

Dr. Maria Dufau

Entry ID: PD-1192

The research of this laboratory focuses on: 1) the structure-function of luteinizing (LHR) and prolactin receptors (PRLR) and regulation of their expression by homologous and heterologous hormones. These topics include the regulation of LHR transcription (silencing/derepression: nuclear orphan receptors, epigenetics second messenger), multiple promoter control of PRLR transcription and PRLR forms of relevance to physiological regulation and breast cancer; and 2) regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis (novel gonadotropin-regulated genes, the function of DdX25 and other RNA helicases in spermatogenesis).

Applicants with a background in molecular biology/biochemistry or cell biology must have a Ph.D. and/or M.D. with less than five years of postdoctoral experience.

To apply contact:

Endocrinology and Reproduction Research Branch, NICHD
Building 49, Room 6A36
49 Convent Drive MSC 4510
Bethesda, MD 20892-4510
Voice: (301) 496-2021
Fax: (301) 480-8010


Mouse Models for Genetic Bone Disease

Dr. Joan Marini

Entry ID: PD-4225

Background

The Bone and Extracellular Matrix Branch of NICHD conducts translational research on genetic disorders of bone. Our interest is in understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which defects in components of matrix cause bone disease, and then in applying this information for the care of our pediatric patients.

Potential Projects

We are seeking to fill a postdoctoral position employing murine models of genetic bone disease. The fellow will use the murine model previously generated in our lab, the Brtl knock-in mouse for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), as well as lead generation of novel transgenic and knock-in mice. Potential projects involve both dominant and newly defined recessive OI:
1. Development of knock-in murine models for recessive OI, recently delineated in our lab (NEJM 355:2757; Nat Genet 39:359), and investigation of bone disease mechanism;
2. Investigation of mechanism of bone quality improvement by homozygosity for a dominant collagen mutation;
3. Modeling novel approaches to OI therapy, (a) gene therapy of OI by hammerhead ribozymes specific for Brtl mutation (involves in vitro RNA studies and tissue culture, plus mouse studies), and (b) administration of chemical chaperones.

Requirements

A background in molecular biology, expertise with murine models, and experience in management of a mouse colony are strongly preferred. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience. To apply, candidates should send a copy of their CV, bibliography, and contact details including phone number and e-mail address for a least 2 references to: Joan C. Marini, M.D., Ph.D., Chief, BEMB, NICHD, NIH to oidoc@helix.nih.gov.

The position is available immediately.


Vascular Development in the Zebrafish

Dr. Brant Weinstein

Entry ID: PD-3804

A postdoctoral position is available at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, to study vascular development in the zebrafish. The laboratory uses molecular, cellular, genetic, and transgenic approaches to study the specification, patterning, and differentiation of the developing vascular system. Some of our current areas of research interest include: understanding how blood vessels are specified and differentiate as arteries or veins; understanding how vessels assemble into reproducibly patterned networks, and what cues guide this patterning; studying how endothelial cells undergo morphogenesis into tubular vessels in vivo using high-resolution multiphoton imaging and experimental manipulation; and isolating novel vascular-specific mutants and studying the molecular basis for their defects.

The scientific environment, resources, and stipend support are superb. See http://uvo.nichd.nih.gov/ for additional information.

Interested applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years' postdoctoral experience. To apply send a curriculum vitae, bibliography, cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to flyingfish2@nih.gov, or via post to:

Brant M. Weinstein
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
NICHD, NIH
Building 6B, Room 309
6 Center Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892


Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics

Dr. Peter Basser

The Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics (STBB), Program on Pediatric Imaging and Tissue Sciences (PPITS), NICHD, is soliciting applications for postdoctoral level scientists interested in developing and implementing novel quantitative MRI methods for a variety of translational research projects. Examples include high-resolution DWI, AxCaliber MRI, Q-Space MRI, and double-PFG MRI. Previous sequence programming experience with Siemens, GE, and/or Philips clinical MRI scanners is desirable.

The appointment will be as an IRTA Post-doctoral Fellow for US citizens, or as a Visiting Fellow for non-US citizens. Applicants must possess a Ph.D. in physics, biomedical or electrical engineering, or an equivalent field, and have completed less than five years of postdoctoral training. Interested applicants should submit: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a bibliography, (3) a cover letter with a brief description of his/her research experience and interests, and (4) a list of at least three references that includes their mailing address, telephone number and e-mail address. Please send this information electronically to pjbasser@helix.nih.gov.

Peter J. Basser, Ph.D.
National Institutes of Health
13 South Drive
Building 13, Room 3W16
Bethesda, MD 20892-5772

(Phone) 301-435-1949
(Fax) 301-435-5035
E-Mail: pjbasser@helix.nih.gov


Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics

Dr. Peter Basser

The Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics (STBB), Program on Pediatric Imaging and Tissue Sciences (PPITS), NICHD, is soliciting applications for postdoctoral level scientists interested in developing and applying novel MR methods for studying water and ion transport mechanisms in tissues, tissue culture systems, or "engineered" tissues. Experience and interest in MRI microscopy, q-space MRI, and/or other porous media MRI methods is desirable. Experience with Bruker MRI scanners is also desirable.

The appointment will be as an IRTA Post-doctoral Fellow for US citizens, or as a Visiting Fellow for non-US citizens. Applicants must possess a Ph.D. in physics, engineering, or an equivalent field, and have completed less than five years of postdoctoral training. Interested applicants should submit: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a bibliography, (3) a cover letter with a brief description of his/her research experience and interests, and (4) a list of at least three references that includes their mailing address, telephone number and e-mail address. Please send this information electronically to pjbasser@helix.nih.gov.

Peter J. Basser, Ph.D.
National Institutes of Health
13 South Drive
Building 13, Room 3W16
Bethesda, MD 20892-5772

(Phone) 301-435-1949
(Fax) 301-435-5035
E-Mail: pjbasser@helix.nih.gov



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